Larry Di Girolamo

Larry Di Girolamo

Associate Professor of Atmospheric Sciences


Prof. Larry Di Girolamo received the B.Sc. (Hons.) degree in astrophysics from Queen's University at Kingston, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, in 1989, and the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in atmospheric and oceanic sciences from McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, in 1992 and 1996, respectively. He then spent two years at the University of Arizona, Tucson, as a postdoctoral research associate before joining the faculty at UIUC in 1998.

Prof. Di Girolamo leads an active research group in remote sensing and radiative transfer. His current research foci lie in the extraction and analysis of cloud and aerosol properties from space, the physics of cloud-aerosol-radiation interactions and their role in the Earth's climate system, the solution to sampling problems inherent to remotely sensed data, and the exploration of three-dimensional radiative transfer issues raised in the remote sensing of cloud, aerosol, and surface properties. He is currently a Science Team Member of the EOS-Terra Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) mission. He is a recipient of two NASA Group Achievement Awards and he was selected under NASA's New Investigator Program in Earth Science in 2002. Prof. Di Griolamo has served for three years on the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Scientific and Technological Activities Commission on Satellite Meteorology and Oceanography. He is currently serving as Editor for the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, Guest Editor on a special issue for the Remote Sensing of Environment, and Co-Chair of the International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing's Working Group on the Atmosphere, Climate and Weather Research. Prof. Di Girolamo is routinely on the List of Teachers Ranked as Excellent at the University of Illinois, where he regularly teaches an introductory course in meteorology and advance courses in satellite remote sensing and radiative transfer.

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